Workshops

Effective Academic Course Design

About the Workshop

The Effective Academic Course Design workshop is the English version of “ "סוף מעשה במחשבה תחילה workshop. In this workshop, we aim to support you through a process of designing your academic course, on the basis of your instructional goals. This workshop is an a-synchronous workshop: it includes nine lectures (in Hebrew with  English subtitles) and supporting activities (in English), including two submissions that will be reviewed by the facilitators.

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The total time estimated to complete the workshop, including the activities is around 5-6.5  hours.

For further details and registration please turn to Orna.Kessler@mail.huji.ac.il

 

 

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Beyond Zoom

About the Workshop

With the outbreak of the corona crisis, we have all adopted emergency instruction via Zoom but instruction via zoom is not the only way to teach remotely nor is it the most effective way, in most cases. What are the alternatives to Zoom and what are the principles for building a good remote learning course? What problems and difficulties are inherent in remote learning and how can they be addressed?

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In the workshop ‘Beyond Zoom’ we will aim at answering some of these questions, clarify the pedagogical principles of remote learning, and present practical examples of tools that can be integrated into your courses.

The workshop is built asynchronously (pre-recorded lectures and accompanying assignments) and self-paced between the designated dates. During this time period, we hope to give an opportunity to describe issues that you have encountered and to discuss solutions with us and with your colleagues.

Additional Information:

Workshop facilitator: Dr. Michal Schodl


zoom logo

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Basic Workshops For Senior Staff

About the Workshop

 3-part workshop for academic teaching training . The purpose of the workshop is to upgrade the skills relevant to effective teaching.
* The workshop is based on group work and includes participation in three parts of the workshop, from the beginning to the end.
The workshop is intended for a new senior staff. 

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Three workshop  parts:

Part A - Short Zoom Meeting - Introduction and Teaching Portfolio . [Duration: two hours]

Part B - Asynchronous workshop about academic course planing.
[Duration: The activity is estimated at 6 hours, which can be done within a period of two weeks].

Part C - Microteaching training in small groups [will be assigned to a face-to-face meeting,  morning or noon [ in which you will present a 7-minute teaching segment of your courses].

* The workshop is based on group work and requires participation throughout both days of the workshop.

 

Learning Outcomes:

 

Following the workshop:

[1] You will be exposed to the portfolio of teaching presented in promotion, you will begin to fulfill it and formulate on it short-term and long-term goals in your development in teaching.

[2] Work on your courses from a learner-focused approach, define learning outcomes and develop new tasks for your course that will achieve the learning outcomes.

[3] You will know how to evaluate the quality of the course structure and the quality of the course.

[4] Improve your frontal teaching skills; Point out different teaching skills in oil and sharpen the ability to identify different teaching skills.

 

Additional Information:

 

In the first part of the workshop we will meet for a short Zoom meeting , in a group of 10 participants we will get to know the group members and the course of the workshop

The second part, includes a self-completion of an online workshop that deals with building an effective academic course based on asynchronous materials and submitting assignments. In this section we will find out what is a good course and what is a good course structure? Define learning outcomes for your chosen course and develop course assignments and receive feedback from the workshop facilitators. You can watch the videos and complete the workshop tasks within two weeks. The total activity time in this section is estimated at about 6 hours and can be done in a span of two weeks at times that are convenient for you, paying attention to deadlines for submitting tasks.

In the third part of the workshop we will meet in groups of 5 [half group]. The session will be face-to-face [in case of an emergency zoom], in which each of you will present a 7-minute teaching segment (from one of your courses) intended for a synchronous session (students and lecturer meet at a given time) or a video you prepared as asynchronous material. Excerpt from a recorded synchronous meeting].

In addition, workshop participants who are interested will be able to send their course syllabus to the workshop facilitators: Michal Shodel and Efrat First by e-mail and receive personalized written feedback on it.

Supervisor: Michal Shodel Ph.D michal.schodl@mail.huji.ac.il

                 

Registration and questions by email: ornake@savion.huji.ac.il

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

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“Interesting but not Relevant”: Relevant Academic Teaching

About the Workshop

Paradoxically, despite the increasing relevance of academic skill to many desirable occupations, many students complain about irrelevant courses.
High level of academic skills is becoming more and more relevant to many occupations. Many employees will be required to read and analyze data, to conduct information searches, to work with partners from all over the world, to solve problems that do not have yet a solution,  and, most importantly, to learn continuously, all their lives. Yet, many students think that their academic degree, or a large part of it, is irrelevant to their future. In this workshop we will understand a little better, why and what can be done about it.

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Learning Outcomes

Following the workshop, the participants will be able to…

  • Describe characteristics of the current labor market and to criticize the prevalent perception of the Y generation and to distinguish between relevance and practicality.
  • Distinguish between three types of irrelevance: Normal, irrelevance due to change in the world, and, educational irrelevance.
  • Discover a variety of examples of practical tools to make the courses more relevant.
  • Practice some of the tools and apply some of them to their own courses.

Additional Information:

Workshop facilitator: Dr. Michal Schodl 

Relevant Academic Teaching

 

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Integration of Technologies and Digital Tools to Empower Teaching and Learning

About the Workshop

In recent years there has been a constant increase in the number of students coming to lectures with cell phones, lap top computers, and tablets. These tools have changed the way and style of teaching but surprisingly, in most cases, have not had a significant effect on the frontal teaching methods used for years. Many teachers have chosen not to harness the new “guests” or integrate them in any way into frontal teaching.

Authority in class

About the Workshop

Authority is not the most important thing for lecturers. However, when something goes wrong in this regard, we understand how important it is in managing an effective learning experience. In this workshop we will present the stance that there is an effective way to deal with authority issues, one which can be taught and practiced.

Experience in Micro-Teaching

About the Workshop

A highly effetive workshop which provides coaching in teaching skills. Each one of the lecturers participating in the workshop prepares in advance a teaching segment of 7 minutes and presents it during the workshop. At the end of the presentation he/she receives feedback from the group and the facilitator, followed by a discussion about the teaching methods witnessed.

Basic Workshop for TAs in Frontal Courses

About the Workshop

Modern day courses suited to teaching in the twenty-first century are characterized by frequent, consistent assignments and exetensive feedback to students. Therefore, the role of the TA is critical in affecting the quality of the course and the students’ learning. The aim of this workshop is to prepare TAs for their role, in particular how to give feedback to students about their work, orally or in writing. In this workshop will analyze dilemmas arising from this, simulate various situations with students, and present relevant examples.

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Learning Outcomes:

Participants will:

  1. Improve (through simulations) the ability to deal with various approaches by students, identifying the need motivating the approach.
  2. Know how to give effective written feedback for assignments.
  3. Learn (through simulations) how to prepare a conversation for returning assignments to groups of students.

Additional Information:

Maximum no. of participants: 15

 

 

Workshop Facilitator:Dr. Michal Schodl

Basic Workshop for TAs in Frontal Courses

 

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How to Motivate Students?

About the Workshop

What would you like to learn about motivation? How to generate enthusiasm among the students? How to get them to make an effort? How to make sure that students come to classes? In this workshop we will deal with common motivational problems and present some knoledge-based ways to solve them.

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Learning Outcomes:

At the end of the workshop the participants will:

  • Be acquainted with seven different means to increase attendance (including examples of the ways they will be implemented by various lecturers).
  • Be able to list six different things that present an obstacle to students making an effort.
  • Know how to implement strategies for tackling obstacles to effort (we will practice them during the workshops).
  • Know how to use the skill of reframing in order to respond to a student’s complaint which offers an opportunity to strengthen his/her motivation.

Additional Information:

The workshop combines theoretical learning with experiential practice, including a brief presentation of current theoretical concepts in the study of motivation.

The workshop is between the hours 9.00 and 13.30.

Maximum no. of participants: 18

 

 

Workshop Facilitator:Dr. Michal Schodl

Motivation
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From Frontal to Online Teaching – Constructing Computerized Teaching Units

About the Workshop

In the framework of modern trends in the academic world, online courses are becoming ever more important and there has been a significant increase in the use of distance teaching and learning. The change from frontal to online teaching demands various changes and adaptations from both pedagogical and technological perspectives. These require re-planning and re-organization of the course.

Starting off on the Right Foot – Correct Management of a First Meeting and the Psychological Contract

About the Workshop

Try to remember yourself as a student going to a new course for the first time at the beginning of the semester. How long did it take you to decide whether the lecturer was any good? Whether it would be interesting? If you are like most people, you formed an opinion very quickly. Although sometimes opinions change over time, in most cases the opening minutes provide rich information, factual and emotional, about what to expect and affect your attitude and commitment to the course.

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This creation of positive expectations and recruiting students to make an effort, within only minutes, is an example of the successful management of the psychological contract. Even if you know that you do it well most years, you might want to increase the number of students who are enthusiastic about the course or put your finger on what exactly is working here. This workshop is intended to improve skills for effectively managing the psychological contract. It is offered in the week before the opening of the academic year (and/or second semester).

Learning Outcomes:

As participants in the workshop you will be able to:

  • List five characteristic questions that many students ask about the course and lecturer when consolidating an opinion about them.
  • Given the opening of a course you will be able to identify the direct and hidden messages in the psychological contract.
  • Suggest alternatives for opening words that will make even more students enthusiastic about learning.

Additional Information:

Maximum no. of participants: 15

 

 

Workshop Facilitator:Dr. Michal Schodl

Right Foot

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Not Just PowerPoint – Getting to Know the Secret Capabilities of the Most Popular Program for Presentations and other Tools for Giving Presentations

About the Workshop

For many lecturers, presentations play a prime role in their teaching and in presenting their ideas to an audience. Most lecturers use PowerPoint, although few are familiar with the range of possibilities it offers.
This workshop will present the less well known add-ons of this program which can help to transform the frontal lecture into active learning, make it thought-provoking, and increase student participation, and we will get to know ways to make the presentation into interactive courseware that speaks for itself.

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Likewise, much of the workshop will be devoted to getting to know alternative platforms that offer different ways, visually and chronologically, to present ideas and practice using them.

This workshop is intended for lecturers with experience in creating presentations. It is advisable to bring a personal PPT which you will be able to work on.

Among the tools that will be presented at the workshop are Prezi, Emaze, Roojoom, Sway, Google presentation (Qַַַ&A), Adobe Spark, Flipsnack, Zeetings and add-ons for PowerPoint such as: office-Mix, Participoll, polleverywhere.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the workshop you will know how to choose the most suitable tool for the needs of your presentation and be able to build an attractive presentation using the chosen tool. You will know how to gather answers to a question from the audience during the lecture and display them in the presentation, and how to enable listeners to send you questions during the lecture without disturbing its course.

Additional Information:

The workshop is 5 hours long

 

 

Workshop Facilitators:Dr. Michal Ramot & Mr. Yohai Ofran 

Not just Power point

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Writing Tests Using Moodle

About the Workshop

Imagine a world in which it is possible to integrate colorful pictures and films into every test question; imagine a world in which it isn’t necessary to make an effort to decode a student’s illegible handwriting; imagine a world in which it isn’t necessary to drag the exam notebooks home or even scan them; imagine a world in which the calculation of grades is done automatically; imagine a world in which you can get statistics about every question in a test – how many got it right and how many made a mistake. If you can imagine this world, it seems that you were thinking about computerized tests using Moodle.

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Although the rumor about the many benefits of these tests has already spread far, many teachers are still afraid of implementing this possibility for various reasons. This workshop, as its name shows, enables participants to understand the range of possibilities offered by the quiz module in Moodle.

Most of the workshop will be devoted to presenting and learning about the types of questions offered by this tool and the ways in which they can be used correctly and effectively. We will get to know questions that use completion, dragging, and matching, and we will learn how we can use embedded answers (cloze questions type) in order to create more complex and advanced questions. We will talk about mixing questions and mixing distractions, how to include optional or bonus questions, and how to create different test sheets in which every student is presented with different questions. We will learn how to import questions from a word file and relate also to additional uses of this tool which do not check knowledge in order to give a grade, such as creating courseware for independent learning and generating practice tests that offer guidance, clues, and immediate feedback.

We will hear abut the possibility of using a secure internet explorer that prevents students taking the test from accessing the internet or other files on the computer during the test. In addition, we will briefly mention the role of the test in the array of assessment and measuring tools and a number of principles and emphases for writing and grading tests.

At the end of the workshop you will be able to create a test on your course website and add to it questions of all kinds. You will know how to designate automatic checking of questions that can be checked in this way, as well as building a test that will serve as courseware with immediate feedback for every answer. You be able to manage the marking system: how to cancel out questions with a low level of assessment and how to add in a grading factor. And you will know how to use this tool in “assessment for learning” and not only as a “final assessment”.

 

 

Workshop Facilitator:Mr. Yohai Ofran 

Writing tests using moodle
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Teaching Large Classes

About the Workshop

Teaching a large class is a challenging task from a number of perspectives. Big classes provide fewer opportunities for a personal connection between lecturer and student, fewer possibilities to activate the students, and the anonymity makes it easier for students to become distracted or become involved in other occupations. Therefore, the various methods for teaching big classes are intended to achieve three central aims: to generate interaction, to maintain concentration, and to regulate student emotions despite the size of the class. In this workshop we experience the effect of these methods on the learner in a large class.

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Learning Outcomes

  • Participants will be introduced to a number of ways to generate interaction in large classes, among students themselves and between students and lecturer.
  • They will learn how to structure presentations suited to keep students concentrated in large classes (such presentations can also serve them also in medium and small classes but will be designed especially to help the students maintain concentration in large classes).
  • They will receive a number of ideas regarding how to regulate students’ emotions in large classes.

 

 

Workshop Facilitator:Dr. Michal Schodle

Large Classes

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Teaching in a Multicultural Classroom – Students From Minority Groups

About the Workshop

At the Hebrew University, Jewish and Arab students learn side by side, as do ultraorthodox, religious, and secular students, new immigrants and native Israelis.
Teaching a heterogenous class is a source of wealth and mutual fertility, but also demands attention to the disparities between the various students and their needs.

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The aim of this workshop is to help participants understand the needs and challenges of students from various groups and to discuss the tools for tackling them. The workshop will discuss the disparities arising from differences in learning habits, knowledge, and cultural background, with an emphasis on students who are the first generation to receive higher education. We will discuss the meaning of a heterogenous class from the perspective of classroom management and relations between students.

Learning Outcomes:

The tools that you will acquire in this workshop will help you to make the classroom a place of multi-cultural encounter and enable every student to integrate and maximize his/her personal abilities.

Additional Information:

The workshop is planned in cooperation with the Center for the Study of Multiculturalism and Diversity at the university.

 

 

Workshop Facilitators:Dr. Michal Ramot & Michal Barak

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Constructing an Academic Course

About the Workshop

In this workshop we will discuss structural decisions regarding course design. Examples of structural decisions include: the number of assignments given in the course, their extent, their frequency, will they be individual or group based? How to keep up a good pace of work considering the constraints of grading assignments, and more.

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We present the view that using learning outcomes as the basic building block of an academic course helps in achieving a good course structure. Learning outcomes are the things that students will know to do as a result of the learning process they experienced in the course. Learning outcomes are the core of well-structured course and the goal of the structure. Learning outcomes are not just empty statements. They are accompanied with a training program that includes course assignments. 
In this workshop we will practice course building skills by working on the participants’ courses. The workshop will provide a number of examples of what we believe are well-structured courses.

Learning Outcomes

  • You will phrase learning products and/or examine learning outcomes that you phrased in the past and take a fresh look at the link between the learning outcomes and the assignments you designated.
  • You will get to know a series of parameters for assessing the quality of the course structure (such as “maintaining learning pace,” “balancing content and skill,” and more).
  • You will be able to look at the syllabus of any course and assess the quality of the course in terms of the parameters that were taught in the workshop and even recommend improvements.
     

Additional Information:

Maximum no. of participants: 15

 

 

Workshop Facilitator: Dr. Michal Schodle 

Constructing an Academic Course

 

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